Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland

Minunăția asta de aventură imaginată de Lewis Caroll pentru a distra fetițele unui prieten într-o călătorie cu barca este una dintre cărțile mele preferate din copilărie, alături de Micul Prinț și Peter Pan. O mai recitesc din când în când așa, de plăcere, și chicotesc de fiecare dată.

S-au făcut și câteva ecranizări, eu am văzut-o pe cea din 2010, cu Johnny Depp și Helena Bonham Carter și, înainte, pe cea din 1999, făcută pentru televiziune, cu Whoopi Goldberg și Gene Wilder. Ba chiar îmi aduc aminte și de niște desene animate în care iepurele alb striga ssssâsssâit „Alliiiiissssss!”

Dacă nu aveți cartea pe acasă, poate fi citită online. în engleză, pe site-ul literature.org. Redau mai jos un fragment din penultimul capitol, scena procesului.

The twelve jurors were all writing very busily on slates. `What are they doing?’ Alice whispered to the Gryphon. `They can’t have anything to put down yet, before the trial’s begun.’

`They’re putting down their names,’ the Gryphon whispered in reply, `for fear they should forget them before the end of the trial.’

`Stupid things!’ Alice began in a loud, indignant voice, but she stopped hastily, for the White Rabbit cried out, `Silence in the court!’ and the King put on his spectacles and looked anxiously round, to make out who was talking.

Alice could see, as well as if she were looking over their shoulders, that all the jurors were writing down `stupid things!’ on their slates, and she could even make out that one of them didn’t know how to spell `stupid,’ and that he had to ask his neighbour to tell him. `A nice muddle their slates’ll be in before the trial’s over!’ thought Alice.

One of the jurors had a pencil that squeaked. This of course, Alice could not stand, and she went round the court and got behind him, and very soon found an opportunity of taking it away. She did it so quickly that the poor little juror (it was Bill, the Lizard) could not make out at all what had become of it; so, after hunting all about for it, he was obliged to write with one finger for the rest of the day; and this was of very little use, as it left no mark on the slate.

`Herald, read the accusation!’ said the King.

On this the White Rabbit blew three blasts on the trumpet, and then unrolled the parchment scroll, and read as follows:–

`The Queen of Hearts, she made some tarts, All on a summer day: The Knave of Hearts, he stole those tarts, And took them quite away!’

`Consider your verdict,’ the King said to the jury.

`Not yet, not yet!’ the Rabbit hastily interrupted. `There’s a great deal to come before that!’

`Call the first witness,’ said the King; and the White Rabbit blew three blasts on the trumpet, and called out, `First witness!’

The first witness was the Hatter. He came in with a teacup in one hand and a piece of bread-and-butter in the other. `I beg pardon, your Majesty,’ he began, `for bringing these in: but I hadn’t quite finished my tea when I was sent for.’

`You ought to have finished,’ said the King. `When did you begin?’

The Hatter looked at the March Hare, who had followed him into the court, arm-in-arm with the Dormouse. `Fourteenth of March, I think it was,’ he said.

`Fifteenth,’ said the March Hare.

`Sixteenth,’ added the Dormouse.

`Write that down,’ the King said to the jury, and the jury eagerly wrote down all three dates on their slates, and then added them up, and reduced the answer to shillings and pence.

`Take off your hat,’ the King said to the Hatter.

`It isn’t mine,’ said the Hatter.

`Stolen!’ the King exclaimed, turning to the jury, who instantly made a memorandum of the fact.

`I keep them to sell,’ the Hatter added as an explanation; `I’ve none of my own. I’m a hatter.’

Here the Queen put on her spectacles, and began staring at the Hatter, who turned pale and fidgeted.

`Give your evidence,’ said the King; `and don’t be nervous, or I’ll have you executed on the spot.’

This did not seem to encourage the witness at all: he kept shifting from one foot to the other, looking uneasily at the Queen, and in his confusion he bit a large piece out of his teacup instead of the bread-and-butter.

Și ca să meargă lectura, vă invit să ascultați ceva frumos: Jefferson Airplane – White Rabbit! Ascultați cu atenție versurile! 🙂

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